Grammy’s

Doc Stewart

Code Blue! was submitted for Grammy consideration in the following categories:

Artist: Doc Stewart Big Band Resuscitation

#31. Best Improvised Solo Patty’s Bossa
#31. Best Improvised Solo The Last Breath Blues – All Alone Now
#33. Best Jazz Instrument Album Code Blue!
#34. Best Large Jazz Ensemble Code Blue!
#40. Best Roots Gospel Album Code Blue!
#61. Best Instrumental Composition The Code Blue Suite (4 movements) – Tom Kubis
#62. Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella Snakin’ the Grass – Tom Kubis
#62. Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella Poor Butterfly – Matt Catingub
#62. Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella The Way You Look Tonight – Matt Catingub
#64. Best Recording Package Code Blue!
#68. Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical Richard Breen, Thomas Vicari, Bernie Grundman

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Review |The Jassman

Doc Stewart

Brian-HoughThe Jassman (Vol. 8 Issue 3) – Brian Hough www.emailwizard.co.za/83P.pdf 

Yep! Doc Stewart really is a doctor. He is an ER doctor for the Mayo Clinic Hospital and his performances on alto sax are as efficacious as his medical expertise.  Stewart’s Code Blue is sub-titled Cannonball Jazz Catalog #CJ-3012 which is a clue to his project of transcribing Cannonball Adderley’s solos.  As the doc would have it, “The Code Blue Suite is a musical creation that tells the story of life and death that I see every day in the ER.”  So, this 19-piece big band has a ball as it romps through some great arrangements of 14 tunes including: Homage to Bud Shank; Introduction to a Samba; Ironman Blues; The Way You Look Tonight; Poor Butterfly and Patty’s Bossa.  On to the nitty-gritty, the album will appeal not only to lovers of modern big band music. There is so much here; highly skilled musos, great energy, great tunes and most of all a highly accomplished swinging band. If this album doesn’t get you to boogie then our doc in the ER cannot save you.  As the message on the cover declares: Big Band Resuscitation!

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Review |FAME

Doc Stewart

Check out this Code Blue! review: Folk & Acoustic Music Exchange (FAME) CD review is smokin’ hot!

Doc Stewart’s a real-life medical doctor, and ironically looks like he just might be the good-guy brother to Scrubs’ devastatingly nasty quipmeister, the aggressive bad-ass Dr. Perry Cox (John C. McGinley). Just as tongue-in-cheekily, he’s accompanied inCode Blue liner photos by a buxom Hello Nurse! (Stewart’s best friend—and wife?—Patty) watching over life or death ministrations to his trusty alto sax, lying helpless right there in the ER. No need to fret, though, as the Doc’s a 24-year emergency vet, and the brass axe pulled through nicely, presently recuperating in a love nest with a sexy little clarinet. The result of his ministrations is more than evident throughout this disc. The only question remaining is: How the hell did he get so good in view of the rigorous educational process and around-the-clock professionalism necessary to an emergency M.D.? And jes’ so’s ya knows the level of quality you’re in for, the Doc’s previous release, Phoenix: A Tribute to Canonball Adderly, debuted in the #1 spot in the indie jazz new releases chart. That’d be a Code Whew! Smokin’!

Code Jesus, a variant of Zawinul’s Birdland, is the fourth movement of the Code Blue Suite, a zesty segment of this perky 14-cut hour+ CD. Lots of circular chases, lay-outs, and straight ahead blowing, not a moment of rest, instead staves and measures of ceaseless rave-up that’ll have you shimmy-boppin’ around the parlor, drink in hand, smile on face. And I really like that sassy end quotation by da Doc, the sort of addendum one rarely hears closing out such escapades. Stewart may be faced with mortality day in and day out, but not an iota of it traces through his disc.

This is big band, music, y’all, boasting a 19-member roster in full regalia. Jazz may have arisen from the blues (but, um, just as much from classical music, I’d contend, from latterday hep catz who had and still have much in common with Bartok, Stravinsky, and others), but there ain’t an ounce of blue matter anywhere here, just swingin’ hyperbolic good times and jammin’. Code Blue is full proof of just how well the fusion was accomplished. Go ahead, try to find me any tight-ass classicalists who can do what these bad boyz are doing. I dares ya. Tons of individuated and integrated multi-solos from varius musicians and layered charts provide no end of intellectual and booty-swaying, fingersnapping, toe-tapping vigor. Stewart gets the lion’s share of the spotlight, as he should, but there’s so damn much going on that you’ll never credit ego, only exuberance. There are quite a few steals written into everything as well, like the Misty refrains in Homage to Bud Shank, which some will tut-tut but I find delightful, sly homages worked into labyrinthine repertoire. Nowadays, ya win some and then ya win some, and, with Code Blue, you’re awarded even more.

Doc-Stewart_Nurse

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Joe Dimino Interview

Doc Stewart

 

Neon JazzHere is a real nice interview with Joe Dimino from a program called Neon Jazz.

Listen to the interview.

Click here to go to Joe Dimino’s page.

 

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Review | Audiophile

Doc Stewart

Jeff Krow from Audiophile Audition gave Code Blue! a smokin’ review!Chris Stewart Project

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Review | Stephen Smoliar

Doc Stewart

CD review by Dr. Stephen Smoliar.

Stephen William Smoliar obtained his PhD in Applied Mathematics and his BSc in Mathematics from MIT. His doctoral dissertation was one of the first in the emerging discipline of computer music. He composed 36 works between 1969 and 1975 and is a former member of the Society for Music Theory. Between 1971 and 2005, he worked primarily as a research in both academic computer science departments and corporate research laboratories. His main areas of research interest were in knowledge representation, perceptual categorization, and cognitive models. He continues to pursue actively research questions concerned with how we both make and listen to music.Stephen Smoliar

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Bobby Shew | World Renowned Trumpeter

Doc Stewart

Bobby-Shew

I really enjoyed your CD.  I have scads of students in the medical field and not ONE is in your league!

…this is a wonderful project and that you used Tom Kubis shows great wisdom. I hope you do well with this project. Congratulations! 

Bobby Shew

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#1 Jazz CD!

Doc Stewart

WXCI in Danbury, CT added Code Blue! as their #1 Jazz CD!WXCI

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Review |All About Jazz

Doc Stewart

Fantastic review of Code Blue! by Edward Blanco from All About Jazz.

Read ReviewIM000892.JPG

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Hal Galper | World Class Pianist

Doc Stewart

Hal Galper, the author of Snakin’ the Grass and world famous pianist, commented on my YouTube video.  He clarified that his song is what is known as a double entendre.

double entendre is a figure of speech in which a spoken or written phrase is devised to be or is unintentionally understood in either of two ways. Typically one of the interpretations is rather obvious whereas the other is more subtle. The more subtle of the interpretations is sometimes sexually suggestive. It may also convey a message that would be socially awkward, or even offensive, to state directly.

Hal Galper is one of the most amazing piano players ever.  He has played with two of my favorite saxophone players.  He started out with the Cannonball Adderley Quintet in March of 1973 replacing George Duke.  His first record with the Quintet was Inside Straight.  He was also a member of the Phil Woods Quintet that included trumpeter Tom Harrell.

I’m honored that Hal Galper felt my performance worthy of his comments!

Hal-Galper

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